Lehrveranstaltungen im Sommersemester 2021

Kolloquium "Law and Finance"

Kolloquium "Law and Finance"

Kolloquium "Law and Finance"

Schwerpunktbereiche 1, 2 und 3 LL.M. in Legal Theory, Module E5

SS 2021

Juniorprofessor Dr. Matthias Goldmann, LL.M. (NYU)

Syllabus and Reading List

 

Course time: Wednesdays 16:00h s.t. -17:30h (4pm-5:30pm CET) on the following dates:

21 April, 5 May, 12 May, 19 May, 26 May, 2 June, 9 June, 16 June, 30 June.

Room: Zoom until further notice.

Enrolment: Please drop an email to Benjamin Arens (arens@jur.uni-frankfurt.de) to enrol and get access to Zoom. You may also enrol via OLAT, but please write to Benjamin in any case.

For those of you who want to take this course for credit towards the Staatsexamen (studienbegleitende Schwerpunktbereichsprüfung): Please enrol for the course at the Schwerpunktbereichsprüfungsamt by filling in this form (PDF) and sending it to pruefungsamtfb01@jur.uni-frankfurt.de.

Learning goals and competencies:

  • Familiarize students with key concepts in economics and finance, as well as with leading cases in the field;
  • Develop a profound understanding of the role of the law and the state for the financial sector, and the role of economic knowledge in the This will be a truly interdisciplinary experience;
  • Engage with crucial contemporary challenges like social equality, or the digitalization of the financial sector (including blockchain technology);
  • Learn to critically engage with state-of-the-art research at the intersection of law and finance;
  • Learn to write reaction papers, e. short, critical comments on readings or case notes. This is a key competence for lawyers. Each reaction paper is individually marked;
  • Learn to develop own research

 

Module description:

The objective of the Kolloquium/Module is for students to acquire a profound understanding of the multiple, intricate relationships between the law and the financial sector, how they mutually shape each other, and how our understanding of them has changed over time. Each class is divided into three parts and requires the preparation of two texts, a theoretical one and a case.

The first part of each class consists in an introduction into a certain period or major event in the evolution of the world economy, starting in the early 20th century. This part serves to familiarize students with key economic concepts. Due to the Covid-19 pandemic, this part will consist in a short, recorded video.

The subsequent parts of each class will take place via Zoom. Each Zoom session will start with a short Q&A session about the video. In the second part, students will discuss a theoretical text that reflects the role of law during the period explained in the first part. The texts will introduce the students to important strands of past and contemporary research on the law and the economy. Authors include Max Weber, Karl Polanyi, Friedrich Hayek, the law & economics literature, Katharina Pistor, and others. In the third part, students discuss a case which reflects, or contrasts with, the concept of law discussed in the second part. These cases address various aspects of the financial sector, including sovereign debt litigation, investment  law, monetary law and bank regulation. Where the reading list proposes more than one case, students can choose which one they would like to read.

The introductory session on 21 April 2020 will provide an overview of the subjects to be covered and train students in writing a reaction paper. There will be a video for this class, too. The zoom meeting starts at 4pm on 21 April 2021. The introductory reading by Britton-Purdy et al. is recommended as a preparatory reading for this class. The text can be downloaded via OLAT and will be circulated to those enrolled in the class.

Videos can be watched via Youtube. The in-person classes will be conducted via Zoom, beginning at 4pm on each scheduled day. The access data to zoom is available via OLAT and will be circulated to enrolled students.

 

Course requirements:

Interest in and/or basic knowledge of questions of finance, law and society.

 

Grade requirements:

Students have to write two reaction papers that engage critically with one of the mandatory readings of the course, i.e. either a theoretical text or a court decision. Each reaction paper may comprise between 1,500 and 2,500 words and may be written in English, German, French, Italian, or Spanish. Reaction papers have to be sent to arens@jur.uni-frankfurt.de by the date and time indicated for each session below. The reaction papers will be assigned to students based on their preferences as indicated in a doodle poll after the first class. In addition, active class participation is required. This includes doing the readings on a regular basis. The mandatory readings were selected with a view to keeping the amount of time necessary for their preparation within reasonable limits. Skipping the readings for one class will create difficulties in subsequent classes, as students will find it difficult to draw comparisons and identify differences.


Course Program (as of January 2021)

21 April 2021 - Class No. 1 - The Role of Law in Financial Capitalism

Part 1: Course Introduction (video)

  • Purpose and overview of the Kolloquium/Module

Part 2: Finance and Economics (video)

  • Key concepts: Money

Part 3: Legal Theory (video)

  • Key questions: State vs Market, self-interest vs. solidarity

Part 4: Practice (in class, beginning at 4pm CET)

  • Q & A on videos
  • How to write a reaction paper

Background reading (not compulsory):

  • Jedediah Britton-Purdy, David Singh Grewal, Amy Kapczynski und K Sabeel Rahman, „Building a law-and-political-economy framework: Beyond the twentieth-century synthesis“, 129 Yale LJ (2019) S. 1784.
  • Justin Desautels-Stein, “The market as a legal concept: classical liberalism, modern liberalism, pragmatic liberalism”, in U. Mattei and J. D. Haskell (eds.), Research Handbook on Political Economy and Law (Elgar 2015) 29-43.
  • Granovetter, Mark. “Economic Action and Social Structure: The Problem of Embeddedness.” American Journal of Sociology, vol. 91, no. 3, 1985, pp. 481–510.

Video Class 1

Materials Class 1

5 May 2021 - Class No. 2 - Industrialization and Legal Rationality

Reaction paper deadline: 4 May 2021, 3pm

Part 1: Finance and Economics (video)

  • History: Industrialization, war economics. Theory: inflation crises.

Part 2: Legal Theory (in class, beginning at 4pm)

  • Max Weber, Economy and Society (1922): vol. 1, pp. 212-223, 311-315; vol. 2, 654-658, 775-776, 784-788, 880-892.

Part 3: Case (in class)

Background readings:

  • Max Weber, Economy and Society (1922): vol. 2, 729-731, 789-791, 892-895.
  • Max Weber, The Protestant Ethic and the Spirit of Capitalism (1904-1905), ch. 5, (notes available here).
  • Emile Durkheim, The Division of Labour in Society (1893), extracts.

Video Class 2

Materials Class 2

 

12 May 2021 - Class No. 3 - Early 20th Century Crises: Disembedded Law

Reaction paper deadline : 11 May 2021, 3pm

Part 1: Finance and Economics (video)

  • History: The Great Depression. Theory: Asset crises.

Part 2: Legal Theory (in class)

  • Karl Polanyi, The Great Transformation (1944): Ch. 1 and 2 (pp. 3-32), Ch. 11 (136-140), (damaged pages available here).

Part 3: Case (in class)

  • Biwater Gauff (Tanzania) Ltd. v. United Republic of Tanzania, ICSID Case No. ARB/05/22, only the following sections (pages): Sec. I (pp. 1-6), ch. V.1 (p. 99), Sec. V.3.C (pp. 132-154), Sec. V.4.C.(1) (only para. 586 on p. 174 and para. 602 on p. 178), Sec. V.4.C.(2)(a)-(c) (p. 180-186).

Background readings:

  • Karl Polanyi, The Great Transformation (1944): Ch. 5 (59-70), Ch. 10 (116-135).
  • John Maynard Keynes, The end of laissez-faire (1926).
  • Robert Hale, "Coercion and Distribution in a Supposedly Non-Coercive State", 38 Political Science Quarterly (1923) 470-494.
  • Poul F. Kjær, “From the Crisis of Corporatism to the Crisis of Governance”, in Poul F Kjær and Niklas Olsen (ed.), Critical Theories of Crisis in Europe: From Weimar to the Euro (Rowman & Littlefield International, 2016) 125-139.

Materials Class 3

19 May 2021 - Class No. 4 - The Welfare State and Social Justice

Reaction paper deadline : 18 May 2021, 3pm

Part 1: Finance and Economics (video)

  • History: Postwar order, Bretton Woods, “trente glorieuse”. Theory: The Welfare State.

Part 2: Legal Theory (in class)

  • Samuel Moyn, Not Enough. Human Rights in an Unequal World (2018): Introduction (pp. 11-11) and Ch. 2 (pp. 41-67).

Part 3: Cases (in class)

  • European Court of Human Rights, Koufaki and Adedy v. Greece, App. Nos. 57665/12 and 57657/12, Decision of 7 May 2013.
  • ECJ, Case C-8/15 P et al., Ledra, ECLI:EU:C:2016:701, judgment of 20 September 2016.
  • ICSID, Urbaser S.A. et al. v. Argentina, Case No. ARB/07/26, Award of 8 December 2016.

Background readings:

  • Samuel Moyn, Not Enough. Human Rights in an Unequal World (2018): Chapters 1 and 3.
  • Juan Pablo Bohoslavsky, “Economic Inequality, Debt Crises and Human Rights”, 41 Yale J. of International Law Online (2016).
  • Daniel Brinks, Julia Dehm and Karen Engle, “Introduction: Human Rights and Economic Inequality”, 10 Humanity: An International Journal of Human Rights, Humanitarianism, and Development (2019) 363-375.
  • Joseph Slaughter, “Hijacking Human Rights: Neoliberalism, the New Historiography, and the End of the Third World” 40 Human Rights Quarterly 735.
  • Matthias Goldmann, “Contesting Austerity: Genealogies of Human Rights Discourse” (March 26, 2020), Max Planck Institute for Comparative Public Law & International Law (MPIL) Research Paper No. 2020- 09, http://dx.doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.3561660 .

Materials Class 4

 

26 May 2021 - Class No. 5 - The 1970s and Neoliberalism

Reaction paper deadline : 25 May 2021, 3pm

Part 1: Finance and Economics (video)

  • History: The crisis of the 1970s. Theory: sovereign debt crises, deflation.

Part 2: Legal Theory (in class)

  • F.A. von Hayek, Law, Legislation and Liberty (1973), vol. 1, ch. 1 (“Reason and Evolution”).

Part 3: Cases (in class)

  • NML Capital, Ltd. v. Republic of Argentina, United States Court of Appeals, 2d Circuit, October 26, 2012 (699 F.3d 246).
  • Bundesverfassungsgericht, Order of 8 May 2007 - 2 BvM 1/03, BVerfGE 118, 124 (134-146) (also availble in German).

Background readings:

  • Friedrich A. von Hayek, The road to serfdom (1944).
  • Thomas Biebricher, “Neoliberalism and Law: The Case of the Balanced Budget Amendment” 17 German Law Journal (2016) 835.
  • Quinn Slobodian, Globalists: The end of empire and the birth of neoliberalism (Harvard University Press, 2018).
  • B.S. Chimni, “International Institutions Today: An Imperial Global State in the Making”, 15 European Journal of International Law (2004) 1-37.
  • Anna Gelpern, “Sovereign Debt: Now What?” 41 Yale Journal of International Law Online (2016) 45.

Materials Class 5

2 June 2021 - Class No. 6 - Globalization and Law&Economics

Reaction paper deadline : 1 June 2021, 3pm

Part 1: Finance and Economics (video)

  • History: Globalization, the “Great Moderation”. Theory: Deregulation.

Part 2: Legal Theory (in class)

  • Gary Becker, The Economic Way of Looking at Life, Nobel Lecture (1992).

Part 3: Cases (in class)

  • SEC v. Life Partners, Inc., 87 F.3d 536 (D.C. Cir. 1996);
  • Poštová banka, a.s. and ISTROKAPITAL SE v. Hellenic Republic, ICSID Case No. ARB/13/8, parts I. (p. 5), III. (pp. 13-25), and V.1.b (only pp. 85-106).

Background readings:

  • Richard A. Posner, “Utilitarianism, Economics, and Legal Theory”, 8 The Journal of Legal Studies (1979) 103-140.
  • Chris Brummer, "Why soft law dominates international finance – and not trade", 13 J Int’l Econ L (2010) 623-43.
  • La Porta, Rafael, Florencio Lopez de Silanes, Andrei Shleifer and Robert W. Vishny, “Law and Finance”, 106 Journal of Political Economy (1998) 1113-1155.
  • Michael J. Sandel, “What Money Can’t Buy: The Moral Limits of Markets”, Tanner Lectures on Human Values, 1998.
  • Michel Foucault, “Governmentality”, in The Foucault Effect (Graham Burchell et al. eds.), 87-104 (1991).

Materials Class 6

 

9 June 2021 - Class No. 7 - The Global Financial Crisis and The Code of Capital

Reaction paper deadline : 8 June 2021, 3pm

Part 1: Finance and Economics (video)

  • History: The Global Financial Crisis. Theory: Banking crises.

Part 2: Legal Theory (in class)

  • Katharina Pistor, The Code of Capital: How the Law Creates Wealth and Inequality (Princeton University Press, 2019), pp. 1-22 (ch. 1), 158-182 (ch. 7).

Part 3: Case (in class)

  • ECJ, Case C-370/12 Pringle, ECLI:EU:C:2012:756, judgment of 27 November 2012.

Background reading:

  • Thomas Piketty, Capital in the 21st Century (2014), Introduction, pp. 1-35, Ch. 5 (The Capital/Income Ratio over the Long Run, incl. the Second Law of Capitalism)
  • Pistor, Katharina, "Towards a Legal Theory of Finance", Columbia Public Law Research Paper (2012), No. 12-323.
  • Lang, Andrew T. F., "The Legal Construction of Economic Rationalities?", 40 Journal of Law and Society (2013) 155-171.
  • Minsky, Hyman P., “The Financial Instability Hypothesis”, Levy Economics Institute Working Paper No 74 (1992).
  • Miller, Geoffrey P. and Gerald Rosenfeld, "Intellectual Hazard: How Conceptual Biases in Complex Organizations Contributed to the Crisis of 2008", 33 Harvard J. of Law and Policy (2008) 807-840.

Materials Class 7

16 June 2021 - Class No. 8 - Sovereign Debt Crisis and Liberal Democracy

Reaction paper deadline : 15 June 2021, 3pm

Part 1: Finance and Economics (video)

  • History: The Tragedy of the Eurozone. From banking crisis to sovereign debt crisis to the Banking Union

Part 2: Legal Theory (in class)

  • Jürgen Habermas, “The Lure of Technocracy: A Plea for European Solidarity”, in id., The Lure of Technocracy (2015) 3-28.

Part 3: Case (in class)

  • BVerfG, Judgment of the Second Senate of 5 May 2020 - 2 BvR 859/15 -, paras. 1-237 (PSPP).

Background reading:

  • Jürgen Habermas, Between Facts and Norms. Contributions to a Discourse Theory of Law and Democracy (Repr. edn., Polity Press, Cambridge 2008), chapter 1.
  • Amartya K. Sen, The Idea of Justice (Harvard University Press, Cambridge, MA 2009), 355 et seq.
  • Wolfgang Streeck, "The Rise of the European Consolidation State", MPIfG Discussion Paper 15/1 (2015), Cologne.
  • Goldmann, M. (2020). The European Economic Constitution after the PSPP Judgment: Towards Integrative Liberalism? German Law Journal, 21(5), 1058-1077. doi:10.1017/glj.2020.64.
  • Matthias Goldmann and Silvia Steininger, "A Discourse Theoretical Approach to Sovereign Debt Restructuring: Towards a Democratic Financial Order", 17 German Law Journal (2016) 709-746.
  • ECJ, Case C-62/14, Gauweiler et al., Judgment of 16 June 2015.

Materials Class 8

 

30 June 2021 - Class No. 9 - Digitalization, Finance, and Law

Reaction paper deadline : 29 June 2021, 3pm

Part 1: Finance and Economics (video)

  • Digitalization in the Financial Sector, Blockchain applications

Part 2: Legal Theory (in class)

  • Vlad Zamfir, Against Szabo’s Law, For A New Crypto Legal System, 26 January 2019. Available here.

Part 3: Case (in class)

  • ECJ, Case C-264/14, Skatteverket, ECLI:EU:C:2015:718, judgment of 22 October 2015.
  • Libra Association, An Introduction to Libra (2019).

Background reading:

Materials Class 9

Kolloquium “Geschichte und Theorie des Völkerrechts”

Kolloquium “Geschichte und Theorie des Völkerrechts”

Kolloquium “Geschichte und Theorie des Völkerrechts”

Goethe University Frankfurt

Fachbereich Rechtswissenschaft

Juniorprof. Dr. Matthias Goldmann, LL.M. (NYU)

SS 2021

SPB 1 und 3

 

Allgemeine Informationen

Veranstaltungszeitpunkt: Montags 14:00-14:45h (Zoom), ein wöchentliches Video, Kursbeginn am 12.4.2021, Kursende am 28.6.2021.

Raum: Videos und Zoom

Zielgruppe: Schwerpunktbereiche 1 und 3, 2 SWS. Auch geöffnet für Studierende vor der Zwischenprüfung.

Leistungsnachweis: Take-Home-Exam (24h), Klausurtermin: tbd. (Die Lösung sollte etwa 2-3 Stunden in Anspruch nehmen.)

Beschreibung: Das Kolloquium bietet Studierenden eine Einführung in die Geschichte und Theorie des Völkerrechts seit der frühen Neuzeit. Geschichte und Theorie sind im Völkerrecht auf das engste verknüpft. Sie lassen sich nicht getrennt voneinander denken. Das liegt daran, dass sich das Völkerrecht nicht von einer Verfassungsordnung her denken lässt und es bis heute auch keine zentralen Institutionen zu seiner Erzeugung bzw. Durchsetzung gibt. Damit stellte sich in jeder Phase der Völkerrechtsgeschichte die Frage, was überhaupt unter Völkerrecht zu verstehen sei, wie es festzustellen, auszulegen und durchzusetzen sei. Selbst ganz praktische Rechtsfragen ließen sich gerade in der Frühneuzeit kaum ohne Rückgriff auf die Theorie beantworten. Doch auch das moderne, vertragsbasierte Völkerrecht, das im letzten Drittel des 19. Jahrhunderts entstanden ist, sieht sich bei jedem historischen Einschnitt, seien es die Weltkriege oder das Ende des Kalten Kriegs, mit diesen Fragen konfrontiert. Das Kolloquium geht der Vermutung nach, dass mit dem Ende der geopolitischen Dominanz des nordatlantischen Raums gegenwärtig ein solcher Einschnitt stattfindet.

Zu jedem Termin wird voraussichtlich ein Video von ca. 20 Minuten bereitgestellt, das einen Überblick über die betreffende Epoche sowie ihre Schlüsselbegriffe bietet. In den Zoom-Sitzungen erschließen sich die Teilnehmenden kurze Texte aus den jeweiligen Epochen. Die regelmäßige, aktive Teilnahme an den Zoom-Sitzungen wird vorausgesetzt.

Anmeldung über OLAT.

Lektüren: Die Lektüren für die jeweiligen Kurseinheiten werden über OLAT bereitgestellt. Zur allgemeinen Lektüre empfehle ich folgende Werke:

  • Fassbender, Bardo, Anne Peters, Simone Peter und Daniel Högger (Hrsg.), The Oxford handbook of the history of international law (2012).
  • Grewe, Wilhelm, Epochen der Völkerrechtsgeschichte (Nomos-Verlagsgesellschaft, 1984).
  • Kadelbach, Stefan, Thomas Kleinlein und David Roth-Isigkeit, System, order, and international law: the early history of international legal thought from Machiavelli to Hegel (Oxford University Press, 2017).
  • Kleinschmidt, Harald, Geschichte des Völkerrechts in Krieg und Frieden (Narr Francke Attempto Verlag, 2013).
  • Koskenniemi, Martti, The Gentle Civilizer of Nations (Cambridge University Press, Cambridge 2002).
  • Orford, Anne, Florian Hoffmann und Martin Clark (Hrsg.), The Oxford handbook of the theory of international law (2016).

Kursprogramm

 

Termin 1: 12. April 2021

Einführung (Video)

  • Völkerrechtsgeschichte zwischen gestern und heute. Auch eine Geschichte der europäischen Expansion.
  • Völkerrechtstheorie zwischen Apologie und Utopie
  • Überblick über die Kursinhalte

Lektüre (Zoom)

Bitte bereiten Sie nach Ihrer Wahl zumindest einen der beiden Texte vor:

  • Koskenniemi, Martti, „The Politics of International Law“, 1 European Journal of International Law (1990) S. 1-32.
  • Fitzmaurice, Andrew, „Context in the History of International Law“, 20 Journal of the History of International Law (2018) S. 5-30.

 

Termin 2: 19. April 2021

Einführung (Video)

  • Die Eroberung von Amerika: Inter caetera, Vertrag von Tordesillas, Entdeckung und Okkupation
  • Europäisches und außereuropäisches Völkerrecht
  • Das ius gentium der Spätscholastik

Lektüre (Zoom)

  • Francisco de Vitoria, Relectiones: Vorlesungen über die kürzlich entdeckten Inder und das Recht der Spanier zum Kriege gegen die Barbaren, 1539 (übersetzt von Walter Schätzel, 1952), Auszug, S. 49-69, 89, 93-103 (insgesamt 18 Seiten in der deutschen Fassung).

 

Termin 3: 26. April 2021

Einführung (Video)

  • Nach der Reformation: Krieg und Frieden, Freiheit der Meere
  • Naturrecht und ius gentium im frühneuzeitlichen Völkerrecht

Lektüre (Zoom)

  • Hugo Grotius, De jure belli ac pacis. Libri tres. Drei Bücher vom Recht des Krieges und des Friedens, 1625. (Prolegomena, übersetzt von Walter Schätzel, 1950), Auszug, Vorrede §§ 1-41 (S. 31-42), 1. Buch Kap. 1 §§ I-XV (S. 47-54), Kap. 3 § I, II, IV-VIII.2, (S. 83-84, 87-91).

 

Termin 4: 3. Mai 2021

Einführung (Video)

  • Nach dem Westfälischen Frieden: Gleiche Souveränität, Erbfolgekriege, Vertrag v. Utrecht, Diplomatie und Sklaverei
  • Naturrecht und positives Recht im klassischen Völkerrecht

Lektüre (Zoom)

  • Emer de Vattel, Le droit des gens ou principes de la loi naturelle appliqués à la conduite et aux affaires des nations et des souverains 1758 (übersetzt von Walter Schätzel, 1959), Auszug: S. 17-27 (El. §§ 1-28), 70f. (Buch I § 81), 184-189 (Buch II §§ 2-12).

 

Termin 5: 10. Mai 2021

Einführung (Video)

  • Nach Revolution und Wiener Kongress: Konzert der Großmächte, Beuteverbot, Sklaverei(handels-)verbot, humanitäres Völkerrecht
  • Vernunftrecht und der lange Schatten des Naturrechts

Lektüre (Zoom)

  • Immanuel Kant, Zum ewigen Frieden, 1796 (Auszug, S. 3-24 in der DB-Ausgabe).

 

Termin 6: 17. Mai 2021

Einführung (Video)

  • Nach dem Krimkrieg: Institut de droit international, Zivilisationsbegriff, internationale Verwaltungsunionen, Berliner Konferenz (Kongokonferenz), Verträge
  • Etatistischer Positivismus im modernen Völkerrecht

Lektüre (Zoom)

 

Termin 7: 24. Mai 2021 (Pfingstmontag – nur Video)

Einführung (Video)

  • Völkerrecht der Zwischenkriegszeit: Wilson, Versailler Vertrag, Völkerbund, ILO, Reparationen, Streitschlichtung
  • Weimarer Methodenstreit im Völkerrecht: Scelle, Kelsen, Verdross, Anschütz, Schmitt, Paschukanis, Heller

 

Termin 8: 31.5.2021

Einführung (Video)

  • Nachkriegszeit: Kooperationsvölkerrecht, internationale Staatengemeinschaft, Gewaltverbot, Menschenrechte
  • Völkerrecht zwischen Realismus, Funktionalismus und Idealismus

Lektüre (Zoom)

  • McDougal, Myres S., „International Law, Power and Policy: A Contemporary Conception“, 82 Recueil des Cours (1953) S. 137-259 (Auszug, S. 137-148).
  • Henkin, Louis, How Nations Behave. Law and Foreign Policy 1st (Pall Mall Press, London 1968), S. 45-58.

 

Termin 9: 7. Juni 2021

Einführung (Video)

  • Dekolonisierung: Selbstbestimmungsrecht, “odious debt”, Minderheiten
  • Third World Approaches to International Law in den 1950ern und 1960ern/70ern

Lektüre (Zoom)

  • Mutua, Makau und Antony Anghie, „What Is TWAIL?“, 94 Proceedings of the Annual Meeting (American Society of International Law) (2000) S. 31-40.

 

Termin 10: 14. Juni 2021

Einführung (Video)

  • Globalisierung 1 – Verrechtlichung und Governance: Verdichtung internationaler Bürokratien, Ausbreitung von Streitbeilegung und Soft Law
  • Law and Economics, sozialwissenschaftliche Ansätze

Lektüre (Zoom)

  • Goldsmith, Jack L. und Eric A. Posner, The Limits of International Law, 2005 (S. 1-17).

 

Termin 11: 21. Juni 2021

Einführung (Video)

  • Globalisierung 2 – Expansion und Emanzipation: Washington Consensus, Humanitäre Intervention, Menschenrechte
  • Konstitutionalisierung und globales Verwaltungsrecht

Lektüre (Zoom)

  • Moyn, Samuel, „A powerless companion: Human rights in the age of neoliberalism“, 77 Law & Contemp. (2014) S. 147-169.

 

Termin 12: 28. Juni 2021

Einführung (Video)

  • Multipolarität: “Backlash” gegen internationale Organisationen und Resilienzen
  • Prozedurale Ansätze, neues Souveränitätsdenken

Lektüre (Zoom)

  • Chesterman, Simon, „Can International Law Survive a Rising China?“, European Journal of International Law (2021) i.E. (14 Seiten).